9 Steps for Establishing Your Employee Engagement Plan

9-steps-for-establishing-your-employee-engagement-plan

You’ve got the best employees on the planet, right? They work hard and are experts in their fields. But, somewhere there is a disconnect. The culture of your organization is not everything it could be, not everything you would like. Is there a way to ensure that your employees hold to the same values you do throughout your department, or the organization? How can you empower your employees, and foster trust, growth, and loyalty? Here are nine ways to fully engage your employees.

Inspiration From the Top

The most important thing that a leader can do to improve employee engagement is to lead by example. Employees must see the owners and executives demonstrating behaviors set forth in the company’s values. They are far more likely to emulate the respected leaders of the organization than live by a disregarded handbook. Managers and business owners should take advantage of collaboration tools such as HR Software when communicating with employees. Opening up communication channels helps employees to feel more valued and inspires better communication from the bottom up.

Read the full article about 9 Steps for Establishing Your Employee Engagement Plan at Innovation Management.

 

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13 Practices of the World’s Most Innovative Organizations

13-practices-of-the-worlds-most-innovative-organizations

Successful organizations know the significance of innovation in business. Apple is a good example of how effective innovation management can improve your products and scale up your business. After reaching on the brink of collapse, it achieved new heights of success by implementing effective innovation management policy. The success of its innovative management strategies once again brought it in the league of leading organizations. If you are an entrepreneur who wants to learn from innovative management strategies of successful organizations, consider the following thirteen strategies.

In non-technical language, innovative management is any process that involves changes in planning, ideation, technical execution and production of resources in a way that can make a system more functional for people. In context of business, it focuses on two major objectives:

  • Improving operational systems of an organization
  • Enhancing products/services for end-users

In the former case, it takes into consideration the leadership, management and resources that make up the working machinery of an organization. In the latter case, it works on the systems and processes involved in creative and technical aspects of developing a product/service. An effective innovation strategy results in better performance of employees, increased productivity and higher customer satisfaction.

Read the full article about 13 Practices of the World’s Most Innovative Organizations at Innovation Management.

 

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The Four Key Capacities to Successfully Engage Employees in the Innovation Process

In this IM Channel One webinar authors Jamie Notter and Maddie Grant share research from their latest book, When Millennials Take Over: Preparing for the Ridiculously Optimistic Future of Business, which identifies the four key capacities that must be developed inside organizations in order to successfully engage employees in the innovation process.

By choosing to be digital, clear, fluid, and fast, organizations achieve greater productivity and more frequent innovation. Understanding why this matters to all generations is central to building a culture that meets these expectations.

Read full Article here>> Four Key Capacities to Successfully Engage Employees in the Innovation Process.

Also Read about the Online learning innovation programs and various Innovation Process of Innovation Management.

Risks in Innovation Leadership Talent

You don’t need to look far to see risk in innovation leadership. Yet many entrepreneurs lack a sufficient understanding of how to judge and deal with risks. In this article we introduce a model for classifying risks in innovation leadership. In turn, we discuss how some of these risks can be reduced or averted, and in some cases even embraced and reframed to mean something positive.

According to some statisticians, more than half of all startups fail within their first five years of existence; figures on innovative startups are even bleaker. A first round of investment is no guarantee for success, either-  the generally accepted figure is that roughly three-quarters of venture-backed firms won’t ever return their money.

One of the inherent virtues of innovation leadership is that the excitement of the opportunity outweighs the perceived risks of loss and failure.

Low probability – low impact risks: to be ignored

Risks that have a low likeliness to occur and low potential impact are not worth spending much, if any, time on. 

Low probability – high impact risks: to be insured

Risks that have a high potential impact but a low probability can often be averted through insurance. This is desirable when the benefits of insurance are likely to outweigh the costs.

High probability – low impact risks: to be averted

These risks, due to their low severity, are as inconvenient as they are avertable. Examples of risk in this category are: a key team member becomes ill just before an important deadline; a computer crashes with all the customer data information.

High probability – high impact: to adapt to

The risks in Quadrant 4 are of key concern for innovation leadership (and any existing business), as they are too costly to insure and cannot simply be ignored or averted due to their severity.These risks are the real company killers, often tapping into the core beliefs and (informed or non-informed) assumptions that businesses have built their product or services on. All elements of the enterprise (market, competition, leadership, operations, legal, finance) are exposed to such risks.

Read more about Risks in Innovation Leadership Talent at Innovation Management