Making Work Fun to Improve Culture and Engagement

For HR and business managers, it can be challenging to create a productive workplace where employees are motivated to be engaged. It may be time to make work fun again with a variety of practices and tools that are implemented. To transform the environment of your workplace and create a positive environment. Here are a few simple changes that can benefit the business.

Schedule outings

Allow your employees to get a break from their cubicle by scheduling outings throughout the month, which can include hosting a movie night at a local theater or taking time to visit the zoo together on the weekend. This will allow them to avoid burnout and get to know one another in a new setting.

You can also schedule sports competitions that allow the staff to compete against one another over a game of baseball, basketball, and soccer. This can offer a greater sense of unity within the company and allow everyone to develop trust and transparency with one another.

Makeover the office

It’s easy for employees to have a lack of motivation when they’re surrounded by white walls and a lack of decor for several hours a day.

Send out a newsletter

Give your staff an interesting piece of reading material during the week by sending out a letter. This can provide fun facts about the company, highlight certain employees, and even provide fun activities to enjoy during the season.

Read more about Making Work Fun to Improve Culture and Engagement visit Innovation Management.

Also visit our various programs of Online Learning Innovation Programs and also get updated with our latest Articles.

 

Advertisements

Try Using the Institutional Yes

When new ideas are voiced in your company is the typical response ‘yes but…’? If so, you’re really saying ‘No’ and closing the door on new ideas and open-minded employees. Paul Sloane says we could all learn a lesson from Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos by implementing the Institutional Yes.

One of the exercises on my Creative Leadership workshop runs like this. People in pairs have short conversations. In the first conversation one person makes a suggestion for something new that could be done for customers (say). The second person replies with an objection. They start their sentence, ‘Yes but….’ The first person then rebuts the objection with another sentence starting.

The results are instructive. Typically the first conversation spirals down into an argument with no agreement. In real life the more powerful person would usually win.

When we say, ‘Yes but….’ we are really saying, ‘No.

The typical responses to a creative suggestion might be:

  • Yes but it would cost too much.
  • Yes but the boss would never agree to that.
  • Yes but we are too busy right now.
  • Yes but we tried something similar last year and it did not work.

Read full Article Here>> Try Using the Institutional Yes

Also Read about Online Learning Training Programs at Innovation Management.

Visioning – 7 Essential Characteristics

The process of visioning may seem both daunting and mysterious. Indeed, it is in no way a straightforward method and there are always rocky rapids to navigate. An understanding of the make-up of this journey will create better results for this process to be a success.

Visioning – the process of coming up with breakthrough ideas – is often assumed to be an isolated and instantaneous affair. We have images of the isolated creative genius experiencing a moment of eureka! in the bathtub, or a great vision while fasting in the desert

If creative leadership can enable their teams to work and interact in an open, connected network, this significantly increases the chance of these ‘lucky’ moments. We know that being an extravert does not correlate with being creative, but being connected does.

It is a path but not a straight one

If visioning is a path rather than a moment it is anything but a straight deductive, linear process to a certain outcome. Instead it is a process that ebbs and flows, that often feels like two steps forward and one step back, sometimes even more steps back.

Read more about Visioning – 7 Essential Characteristics at Innovation Management

You can also find such more articles at Innovation Management’s Article Library Section.

Intuition and Deliberation for Better Decision-Making

We live in an age of change and uncertainty. For businesses, this means that only the most versatile survive —innovate or die. Simply adapting to the digital age is not enough: company survival requires explorative business strategies, to find new opportunities to improve and renew products and services. To attain explorative success you need a combination of both deliberate thinking and intuitive thinking. This article explores how you can balance the two.

In this article we bridge theory and practice on organizing imagination and innovation by extracting key implications and offering new insights to innovation practitioners. This article builds on The Role of Intuition and Deliberation for Exploitation and Exploration Success by Kurt Matzler, Borislav Uzelac, and Florian Bauer and explains why intuition and deliberation jointly make for better decision-making.

Rapid developments in computing have led to an ever-increasing digitization, causing unprecedented rates of change to society. We live in an age of change and uncertainty.

The Role of Intuition and Deliberation for Exploitation and Exploration Success, examines the link between explorative and exploitative business strategies on the one hand, and intuitive and analytical deliberate thinking on the other. Its authors, Kurt Matzler, Borislav Uzelac and Florian Bauer find that:

  • Intuitive and deliberate thinking are not two opposing poles of a continuum, but two intertwined modes of information processing.
  • Both intuitive and deliberate decision-making are positively associated with explorative success.

To read full article about Intuition and Deliberation for Better Decision-Making visit Innovation Management.

Risks in Innovation Leadership Talent

You don’t need to look far to see risk in innovation leadership. Yet many entrepreneurs lack a sufficient understanding of how to judge and deal with risks. In this article we introduce a model for classifying risks in innovation leadership. In turn, we discuss how some of these risks can be reduced or averted, and in some cases even embraced and reframed to mean something positive.

According to some statisticians, more than half of all startups fail within their first five years of existence; figures on innovative startups are even bleaker. A first round of investment is no guarantee for success, either-  the generally accepted figure is that roughly three-quarters of venture-backed firms won’t ever return their money.

One of the inherent virtues of innovation leadership is that the excitement of the opportunity outweighs the perceived risks of loss and failure.

Low probability – low impact risks: to be ignored

Risks that have a low likeliness to occur and low potential impact are not worth spending much, if any, time on. 

Low probability – high impact risks: to be insured

Risks that have a high potential impact but a low probability can often be averted through insurance. This is desirable when the benefits of insurance are likely to outweigh the costs.

High probability – low impact risks: to be averted

These risks, due to their low severity, are as inconvenient as they are avertable. Examples of risk in this category are: a key team member becomes ill just before an important deadline; a computer crashes with all the customer data information.

High probability – high impact: to adapt to

The risks in Quadrant 4 are of key concern for innovation leadership (and any existing business), as they are too costly to insure and cannot simply be ignored or averted due to their severity.These risks are the real company killers, often tapping into the core beliefs and (informed or non-informed) assumptions that businesses have built their product or services on. All elements of the enterprise (market, competition, leadership, operations, legal, finance) are exposed to such risks.

Read more about Risks in Innovation Leadership Talent at Innovation Management